Lamb Chops Scottadito

Lamb Chops Scottadito

In Italian the word scottadito means burned fingers. This dish is named scottadito because the lamb chops are so delicious that you can’t resist eating them sizzling hot, straight from the grill and burning your fingers. Serves 4 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped 2 tablespoons chopped fresh rosemary 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil salt and pepper to taste 12 rib lamb chops In a small bowl stir together the garlic, rosemary, olive oil, salt and pepper. Place the lamb chops in a shallow dish and pour the marinade over them, turn the cops to coat both sides. Cover and refrigerate at least 2 hours. Start a fire in a charcoal grill or preheat a gas grill. Place the chops on the rack over high heat and grill turning once, 5 minutes per side for medium rare. The outside will be well seared with the insides still pink. Transfer to a warm platter and serve...
Bresaola with Arugula

Bresaola with Arugula

Bresaola is a cured and air dried beef that is the specialty of Valtellina in the Lombardy region in northern Italy. You should be able to find it in a good Italian deli or specialty store. I remember whenever my Dad had some in the restaurant, I used to love slicing it up paper thin, drizzling a little extra virgin olive oil and squeezing some lemon on it for a little snack just before the dinner rush hit. It is even better when you add some arugula, shaved Parmagiano-Reggiano and cracked black pepper. Bresaola with Arugula Recipe Serves 4 6 ounces of thinly sliced bresaola 2 cups of baby arugula, rinsed and patted dry extra-virgin olive oil one lemon, cut in half 1 hunk Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese freshly ground black pepper to taste Using 4 small dishes, spread out 1/4 of the bresaola in each dish, slighty overlapping the pieces. Pile a handful of the arugula in the center of each dish Drizzle with olive oil and squeeze a little lemon juice over each plate. Top with shavings of Parmigiano-Reggiano (use a vegetable peeler) and a few twists of the pepper grinder and...
Prosciutto e Melone

Prosciutto e Melone

Prosciutto and Melon is another simple and classic Italian combination in the same vein as last week’s Caprese Salad. Once again, quality ingredients are key here, use good imported Prosciutto di Parma or if you want to try something different, Prosciutto di San Daniele from the Friuli-Venezia Giulia region of Italy. The balsamic vinegar is optional, but does add a nice touch. Please only use it if you have a really good aged balsamic vinegar, not that phony supermarket balsamic. And remember a little goes a long way. At first glance, this doesn’t seem like much of a recipe, but it really is an awesome combination, and is worth posting here if only to remind you of something you may not have had in a while. The saltiness of the prosciutto and the sweetness of the cantelope really play off of each other. Nothing beats being able to throw something so delicious and satisfying together so quickly. Prosciutto and Melon Recipe 1 cantelope or honeydew melon 1/2 pound Prosciutto di Parma, sliced paper thin Balsamic vinegar for drizzling (optional) Cut the melon in half, remove the seeds and slice into 1-inch slices, removing the rind. Wrap each slice of melon in a slice of prosciutto, leaving a little melon showing at the ends. Arrange in serving plates, and drizzle with a few drops of balsamic vinegar, if using, and...
Caprese Salad

Caprese Salad

Recently I conducted a small poll on the Italian Chef Facebook page asking what kind of summer recipes people wanted to see more of here. No cook recipes like salads and cold antipasti narrowly beat out Italian grilling recipes. So, over the next couple of weeks I am going to feature some of my best salads and such, starting here with my own personal favorite summer dish, Caprese Salad. This salad is simplicity at it’s best: tomatoes, mozzarella, olive oil and basil. It is very important that all of the ingredients be the best quality you can find. Tomatoes and basil fresh from your own garden or the local farmer’s market, your finest extra-virgin olive oil, and fresh mozzarrella from a source you trust. In Campania, Insalata Caprese is made with local fresh buffalo mozzarella, one of the culinary delights of the region. Here in America, buffalo mozzarella is very hard to find so we substitute good quality cow’s milk mozzarella, called fior di latte in Italy. Even if you can find imported Mozzarella di Bufala in a specialty store, you are better off with good fresh cow’s milk mozzarella from a deli or cheese maker you trust, because buffalo mozzarella is best eaten as soon after it is made as possible and does not travel well. Caprese Salad Recipe Prep time: 15 min Serves 4-6 2 pounds ripe tomatoes, sliced 1/4 inch thick 1 pound fresh mozzarella, sliced 1/4 inch thick 4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 5 to 8 fresh basil leaves salt to taste Arrange tomato slices on a platter. Top each tomato with a slice of...