Ossobuco

Ossobuco

Ossobuco is a classic Milanese dish that pairs perfectly with another specialty from the Lombardy region, saffron infused Risotto alla Milanese. The name Ossobuco literally translates to “bone with a hole” which is a reference to the marrow filled hole in the center of the veal shank. You might be tempted to skip the tying of the veal shanks, but if you do you risk ending up with the meat separating completely from the bone and falling apart into the sauce. If you are not comfortable tying them yourself, ask your butcher to do it for you when you purchase them. Ossobuco Recipe Serves 4 4 tablespoons olive oil 4 veal shanks cut about 3 inches thick, each tied tightly cross-wise flour, spread on a plate 1 small onion chopped fine 2 carrots chopped fine 2 stalks of celery chopped fine 3/4 cup dry white wine 4 tablespoons butter 1-1/2 cups chicken broth 1 cup imported Italian tomatoes, crushed with their juices freshly ground pepper to taste salt to taste Heat the 4 tablespoons of olive oil in a large sautè pan over medium heat. Dredge the veal shanks in the flour, coating on all sides and shake off the excess flour. When the oil is hot, slip in the shanks and brown them on all sides. Remove the veal shanks and reserve. Add the onion, carrot and celery to the pan. Cook until the vegetables soften, about 10 minutes. Add the wine and reduce for two minutes, scraping loose the browning residues stuck to the bottom of the pan. Then add the reserved veal shanks back to the...
Saltimbocca alla Romana

Saltimbocca alla Romana

Saltimbocca is a classic Roman veal dish. In fact, it is so typically Roman that the name Saltimbocca alla Romana seems redundant to me. But, that’s what it was called on my father’s menu, so I am sticking with it. This is a great dish to serve for company. Plate it over some sautèed spinach and it will make quite an impression. The literal translation of saltimbocca is “jump in the mouth”, and that’s precisely what this tasty combination of veal, prosciutto, sage and white wine will do. Saltimbocca alla Romana Recipe Prep time: 20 min | Cook time: 10 min | Total time: 30 min Serves 4 8 slices prosciutto 8 veal scalloppine, thinly sliced and pounded flour spread on a plate for dredging 2 tablespoons olive oil 2 tablespoons butter 8 sage leaves 1/2 cup dry white wine 1/4 cup chicken broth salt and pepper to taste Place one slice of prosciutto on each veal scalloppine and pound in lightly with a meat pounder. Heat olive oil in a large sauté pan over medium-high heat. Dredge both sides of the scalloppine in flour to coat, shaking off any excess. Place them prosciutto side down in pan and cook, turning once, until lightly browned on both sides. Transfer to a warm plate. Drain oil from pan, place back over heat and add butter. When butter is melted add sage and sauté for one minute. Add the white wine and scrape loose any bits from bottom of pan, then add the chicken broth and salt and pepper. Place scalloppine back in pan, prosciutto side up and cook until sauce...
Sunday Dinner: Cotoletta alla Bolognese

Sunday Dinner: Cotoletta alla Bolognese

Earlier in the week I featured a recipe for Veal Cutlets Milanese that was pretty popular. So, I thought I would keep the cutlet theme going by recommending a very different style from The Italian Chef archives for your Sunday dinner this week. The Veal Cutlets of Trattoria Battibecco is a variation on Bolognese Style Veal Cutlets that we got permission to reprint from the excellent cookbook Biba’s Italy: Favorite Recipes from the Splendid Cities by Biba Caggiano. The cutlets are coated in Parmagianno-Reggiano cheese before being breaded and fried, topped with Prosciutto di Parma and Fontina cheese, then finished in a reduction of cream, butter and broth. The last time I made this I served it with some asparagus tossed in olive oil, salt and pepper then baked in the oven at 350 degrees until tender (about 10 to 15 minutes). Recipe: The Veal Cutlets of Trattoria...
Veal Cutlets Milanese Style

Veal Cutlets Milanese Style

Veal Milanese is one of those recipes that you should be able to find on a site called The Italian Chef, but inexplicably it has been absent here up until now. I decided to rectify this, but have been struggling with a write-up to go along with the recipe. Everything I came up with about cutlets being a staple of Italian cooking and the most well known preparation being this classic from Milan just seemed dry and boring. So I thought I would just share a cutlet story from one of my Italy trips. Years ago I took a trip to Sicily with my cousins Sal and Francesca. We have family in a town called Francavilla di Sicilia which is between Catania and Messina. Sal and Frances have family on their mother’s side just outside Catania, and since that is where we flew into we spent the first few days of the trip there before continuing on to Francavilla. On our first day, Sal’s aunt made pasta with a cream sauce. They gave me a bowl the size of a family style serving dish, which had to have one pound of pasta with cream sauce in it. I tried my best to eat it all but could only get three quarters of the way through. After much interrogation about whether I liked it or not I was finally able to convince them that I was just full. However, from that point on all I heard was how I did not eat much. I would be introduced to people, “Questa e Filipo, non mangia troppo (This is Phillip, he doesn’t...